How to Easily Can Carrots | CANNING RECIPES

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jar of canned carrots looking down top of jar

How to Can Carrots

Do you love carrots as much as we do? You can can carrots in chunks or sticks.  I’ve found that the sticks get stuck when you try to remove in the regular size jars (we use wide mouth).    You can use a mandolin to cut the carrots or a nice sharp knife.  You pick what works for you.

Canning carrots is not terribly difficult and so rewarding when you can dump a can of them into the dish you are making or serve them up with a little butter, maple syrup or honey and enjoy.

Below is how you raw pack carrots.

cutting board with whole peeled carrots

How Many Carrots Do I Need?

We bought 10 pounds and they made 7 quarts, or 14 pints. Consider how many times you serve them in a year and that is how many jars you will want.  When we make a roast, we use a quart (because we really like them).  Adjust to your preference.

preparing to fill jars

Do I Have To Can Carrots In Chunks?

No. You can cut them into sticks, chunks, little circles, however you want.  Be sure to use a canning jar that they will be easy to remove once they are cooked.  We have learned that wide mouth jars work best for us.

pressure canner with jars of carrots

What Is Raw Pack versus Hot Packing?

Simply put, raw pack canning, you do not park or fully cook the vegetables before processing.

pressure canner with jars to process

Do You Need To Peel The Carrots?

Yes.  The Ball recipe we follow states to wash them under cold water.  You then peel and remove both ends before slicing and dicing.

What Size Carrots Are Best For Canning?

Personal preference on how many you want to peel.  I prefer larger ‘normal’ size versus the smaller varieties.  I would rather peel larger than smaller veggies.

What Is The Best Way To Peel?

Lots of trial and error for what works best for you.  I prefer to place the carrot over the bowl with a peeler and move back and forth, not lifting the peeler.  Rotating the the carrot as you peel seems to move faster.  Flipping it end over end and peeling the end gets the entire thing peels quickly.

jar of canned carrots looking down top of jar
Print Recipe
5 from 1 vote

Canning Carrots Recipe

How to can carrots and have them on hand when you need them. Great for adding into your roast, soups, cakes and muffins.
Course: Canning
Cuisine: American
Servings: 7 quarts
Author: Regina Sober

Ingredients

  • clean washed and peeled carrots
  • water
  • salt

Instructions

  • Place water in pressure canner and heat
  • Peel the carrots. Cube, slice or leave the carrots whole (as long as they will fit in the jar!)
  • Fill the jars with carrots below the neck of the jar. (1" headspace)
  • Fill the jar with hot water up to the neck of the jar, leaving a 1 inch head space between the water and lid.
  • Wipe jar rim with clean wet towel.
  • Place the lid and band on the jar and finger tighten.
  • Place the jars in the pressure cooker
  • Add at least 2 inches of water into canner. Water should be same temp as jars.
  • Close the pressure canner and allow the canner to vent steam for 10 minutes and then put weighted gauge on canner.
  • Ensure to put the pressure regulator on the pressure cooker to allow pressure to build.
  • Let pressure build to 10 pounds.
  • Once pressure is at 10 pounds, set a timer and allow to maintain this pressure for 25 minutes for pints, 30 minutes for quarts.
  • When done, turn off the heat and wait for the pressure to go to zero.
  • Carefully remove the top of the canner, not tipping towards you, tip away. There will be steam and hot water dripping.
  • Allow the jars to sit in the canner 5 minutes before removing.
  • Remove the jars and place on the counter to cool. (we place a towel down on the counter.
  • Cover the jars with a towel to allow them to cool slowly and prevent jars coming in contact with sudden change in temp.
  • Remove the bands after 12 hours and check to ensure jars have sealed.
  • Label and date the jars.

Video

YouTube video
how to can carrots and have them on hand when you need them. Great for adding into your roast, soups, cakes and muffins.

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26 Comments

  1. Pingback: Canning is CANtastic, no Really
    1. Were they yellow carrots to start with? I am not an expert on why they would have turned yellow if they were orange. I’m guessing, but it sounds like the color drained from them during the process. How do they taste?

  2. I am going to bookmark this, I have always frozen carrots because I didn’t think home canned carrots would taste good until a friend gave me a jar. They were really very good.

  3. I grew up with a grandmother and mother who canned every summer but I have never seen them can carrots! What a great idea! Should have thought of that since they would can their own veggie soup which had carrots in it! Thanks!

  4. I think next summer I will have a full garden and I want to start canning tomaotes especially to make sauce, my daughter loved it but i only had one plant and not enough to can

    sibabe64 at ptd dot net

    1. If you find a good sauce recipe, please share it. I havent’ found one I like. I made a small batch to test before canning a lot.

  5. I have never canned anything, but I’ve always wanted to – I agree that it sounds fun 😀

  6. You brought back childhood memories of my mother canning our garden veggies. We used to get to help, thank you, great post.

  7. we love these 🙂 the mexican restaurant that we also go have something like this and they are yummy

  8. Yum! Your canned carrots look so good, I wish I was your neighbor so I could drop a friendly hint about sharing!

    1. I would definitely give you a jar if you were in the the area. Put some in a roast tonight too. Doesn’t get fresher than that!

  9. We love canning! You can save so much money, and it is much healthier than traditional “canned” goods.

    1. You definitely can save money and know exactly what is in your foods when you can them yourself.

  10. That is so awesome! It makes me want to attempt canning, myself. 🙂

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